Creekview Elementary and Tomball Junior High Each Recognized as a Model Professional Learning Community at Work™

TOMBALL — Creekview Elementary and Tomball Junior High School were each recently recognized by Solution Tree for their sustained success in raising student achievement. The schools’ successful implementation of the Professional Learning Communities at Work™ process was a major contributing factor in the improved achievement of its students.

PLCs are schools and districts in which educators recognize the key to improved learning for students is on-going, job-embedded learning for the adults who serve those students. The three big ideas of a PLC call upon educators to:

  1. Focus on learning.
  2. Build a collaborative culture.
  3. Create a results orientation. 

“Being recognized as a PLC Model School means so much to our teams both personally and professionally,” former Creekview Elementary Principal Niesa Glenewinkel said. “We are on a mission to ensure that every student masters the essential learning they need to be successful in the next grade level and ultimately graduate from high school increasing their opportunities to choose their career path and create a healthy, kind, positive future for our community.”

“For the past several years, the staff of Tomball Junior High has committed to implementing strategies as a Professional Learning Community to guarantee learning and ensure success for all students,” Tomball Junior High Principal Chad Allman said. “As a result, our students have shown growth in test scores, grades, and overall learning.  It is the best example of our motto in action:  One Team, One Goal.”

Schools are recognized based on strict criteria, including demonstration of a commitment to PLC concepts, implementation of these concepts for at least three years, and clear evidence of improved student learning over that period. Once measurable results can be seen, the school must explain its practices, structures, and culture and submit its application for consideration by the PLC Review Committee.

According to the Champions of PLC at Work™, educators in the schools and districts selected for this recognition have shown “a sustained commitment to helping all of their students achieve at high levels. They have been willing to alter the structure and culture of the organization to reflect their commitment. We applaud them and congratulate them for achieving this very significant milestone on the never-ending PLC journey.”

Recognized model PLC schools are listed on allthingsplc.info, where they share implementation strategies, structures, and performance with other educators interested in improving their schools. Tools for team collaboration, articles and research about PLCs, blog posts, and other related resources are also available on the site. The site was developed and is maintained by Solution Tree, a leading provider of educational strategies and tools that improve staff and student performance. For more than 20 years, Solution Tree resources have helped K–12 teachers and administrators create schools where all children succeed.

“I am so proud of the work we have done together.  Our teachers are the HEROES in the lives of our students,” Glenewinkel said.

“Tomball Junior High School is honored to be recognized as a Model PLC school  and we look forward to continuing this commitment to continue helping every student reach their potential,” Allman said.

Read more about Creekview Elementary’s success story.

Read more about Tomball Junior High’s success story.

Creekview Elementary and Tomball Junior High become the second and third schools in Tomball ISD, joining Canyon Pointe Elementary as Model PLC Schools. CPES was recognized in late 2019.


ABOUT TOMBALL ISD
Tomball ISD educates students to become responsible, productive citizens by providing innovative, individually rigorous, and personally valuable educational experiences. Founded in 1908, Tomball ISD now encompasses 83 square miles in northwest Harris County and southwest Montgomery County, and is located approximately 30 miles from downtown Houston. The district currently educates over 18,000 students at 20 campuses.